Inspirational Quotes

196

“Morals are about what we do when we think nobody is looking. They are not about denouncing other people for doing things that we wouldn’t do ourselves.”, Peter Hitchens, Mail on Sunday column for 30 September 2018,; his column is online at: http://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/

 

195

“This world is no native country of yours; go where you will, you are only a foreigner, only a visitor in it. Nothing will ever bring you rest, except being closely united in Jesus. … Heaven is your destination, and you should look upon this earthly scene only as a transition camp.” Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ, II, 2  (1418–1427), trans. Ronald Knox and Michael Oakley, London, Burnes & Oates, 1960, p. 70.

194

“God loves me whether I ‘feel’ it or not. Christians who gauge their relationship with Christ only by their feelings seldom have a stable spiritual life” – Billy Graham, Hope for each day. Words of wisdom and faith, Nashville, Thomas Nelson, 2002, p. 220 (reading for July 17).

193

“There are those who hate Christianity and call their hatred an all-embracing love for all religions” – attributed to G. K. Chesterton.

192

“We [Christians] must divest ourselves of hope which … is reliance on things turning out well for ourselves … in the future. This kind of hope would be ‘hope for the wrong thing’, that is, for satisfaction or fulfilment, for improvement and well-being, in temporal affairs. Christian hope demands the laying aside of this kind of ‘hope’. It involves a trust which would survive the defeat or disappointment of all earthly hopes.” – Harry Blamires, Word Unheard. A Guide Through Eliot’s Four Quartets, London and New York, Routledge, 2016 (originally Methuen, 1969) p. 62.

191

“C. S. Lewis described hell as ‘a state where everyone is perpetually concerned about his own dignity and advancement, where everyone has a grievance, and where everyone lives with the deadly serious passions of envy, self-importance and resentment.’ That sums up Twitter nicely”. – Freddy Gray, The Catholic Herald, 19 January 208, p. 19.

190

A new prisoner “…had gone to the doctor complaining of depression (no one uses the word unhappiness these days, all deviation from the state of permanent bliss being considered an illness), and his doctor had prescribed him antidepressants, as doctors almost always do these days in these circumstances.” – Theodore Dalrymple, The knife went in. Murder and the decline of our culture. Memoirs of a prison doctor and psychiatrist, London, Gibson Square, 2017, p. 86.

189

“The deep cultural forces that have been separating the West from God for centuries will not be halted or reversed by a single election [eg. that of Donald Trump as US President], or any election at all.” (p. 99) and “Ideology is the enemy of joyful community life, and the most destructive ideology is the belief that creating utopia is possible” (p. 139) – Rod Dreher, The Benedict Option. A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation, New York, Sentinel (Penguin Random House), 2017.

188

“Perhaps a greater tragedy than a broken dream is a life forever defined by it” – Sheridan Voysey, Resurrection Year. Turning Broken Dreams Into New Beginnings, Nashville, Thomas Nelson, 2013, p. xii.

187

“Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all” – attributed to Dale Carnegie.

186

“It appears that we’re expected to base our [theological/religious] views on how people feel, rather than what God has said.” – an unnamed Blackburn Diocesan Synod member quoted by Andrew Symes (Anglican Mainstream), in connection with the Blackburn Diocese decision to create a liturgy to “mark and celebrate someone’s ‘gender transition’” – Trans equality in Blackburn: a new doctrine of humanity?, 26 May 2015, http://anglicanmainstream.org/trans-equality-in-blackburn-a-new-doctrine-of-humanity/

185

“We are moving against the tide of our culture. If we are not moving forward we will be swept backwards. Standing still is not an option” – Steve Silvester, WordLive (Scripture Union), 26 February 2016.

184

“In the world it is called Tolerance [today, we might say “toleration], but in hell it is called Despair, the sin that believes in nothing, cares for nothing, seeks to know nothing, interferes with nothing, enjoys nothing, hates nothing, finds purpose in nothing, lives for nothing, and remains alive because there is nothing for which it will die.” – Dorothy L. Sayers, in Clouds of Witness (quoted in the Advent Meditation for Thursday 12 December 2015, by the Anglican Mainstream site, http://anglicanmainstream.org/advent-meditations-thursday-17-december/

183

“If you think there is no God, you had better be right” – words from a poster outside a Baptist church in Norfolk, England, which were the cause of the pastor’s being interviewed by the police. See Brendan O’Neil’s article, ‘The New Inquisition’ (11 November 2015), http://brendanoneill.co.uk/post/132996389494/the-new-inquisition

182

“There was never a more gracious teacher than Jesus; nor was there ever a severer. Perhaps, if we gave more attention to His “hard sayings” the quality of our discipleship would be stauncher. The general tendency to-day it to dwell on the lighter and easier aspects of discipleship. The austerer lines are smoothed out, and Christian discipleship is made to have a velvety feel about it. This is a cheap and easy way of recruiting new converts.  It brings to the Church’s banners many who can shout slogans and sing choruses; but these are the sort who soon become backsliders, and who are then more difficult to reclaim than they were to be first recruited.” – J. Sidlow Baxter, Studies in Problem Texts, London, Marshall, Morgan & Scott, Ltd., 1949, p. 41.

181

“The grandchildren of the all-too-politically-correct Germans will sit beside the Rhine in their poverty and weep in despair. They will curse their grandparents for allowing their civilization and their culture to snuff itself out. Our generation will all be gone by then, but those grandchildren of the modern-day Germans will witness the horror of one of the greatest transformations in history – the disintegration and collapse of Western Europe – a whole civilization.” – Alexios Komnenos commenting on Germany’sImpending Economic Decline (9 June 2015), by Marcus Roberts on Mercatornet’s Demography is Destiny blog, an article which outlines the effects of the demographic winter on Germany, and the replacement of the German people and culture with ones from outside Europe: http://www.mercatornet.com/demography/view/germanys-impending-economic-decline/16290

180

“It appears that we’re expected to base our [theological/religious] views on how people feel, rather than what God has said.” – an unnamed Blackburn Diocesan Synod member quoted by Andrew Symes (Anglican Mainstream), in connection with the Blackburn Diocese decision to create a liturgy to “mark and celebrate someone’s ‘gender transition’” – Trans equality in Blackburn: a new doctrine of humanity?, 26 May 2015, http://anglicanmainstream.org/trans-equality-in-blackburn-a-new-doctrine-of-humanity/

179

“As the nation declines in power and wealth, a universal pessimism gradually pervades the people, and itself hastens the decline”. – attributed to Sir John Glubb, The Fate of Empires (1978).

178

“The idea that we can create a heaven on earth through pharmacology and neuroscience is as utopian as the Marxist hope that we could create a perfect world by rearranging the means of production. The history of totalitarianism is the history of the quest to transcend the human condition and create a society where our deepest meaning and destiny are realized simply by virtue of the fact that we live in it. It cannot be done, and even if, as often in the case of liberal fascism, the effort is very careful to be humane and decent, it will still result in a kind of benign tyranny where some people get to impose their ideas of goodness and happiness on those who may not share them” – Jonah Goldberg, Liberal fascism. The secret history of the left from Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning, London, Penguin Books, 2009, pp. 20-21.

177

“Christianity as it is practised today [unlike in the Middle Ages] is a rather mild social philosophy …” – Fred Hoyle and N. C. Wickramsinghe, Evolution From Space, London, J. M. Dent, 1981, p. 133.

176

“The only thing that’s taught one anything is suffering. Not success, not happiness, not anything like that. The only thing that really teaches one what life’s about … is suffering” – attributed to Malcolm Muggeridge.

175

“Freedom is the ability not to insist on my rights, but to see that God gets his” -attributed to Oswald Chambers.

174

“The duped dhimmis in the West [Western political leaders and media people] in other words are just as responsible for these daily terror attacks as are the attackers themselves. By defending the attackers and blaming the West instead, they are simply enabling and encouraging plenty more such attacks” – Bill Muehlenberg responding to the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, and others, Western Dhimmitude is Enabling Bloody Jihad, Culture Watch, 8 January 2015, http://billmuehlenberg.com/2015/01/08/westernodhimmitude-is-enabling-bloody-jihad/

173

“When people no longer hear the voice of tradition in their souls, they’re ready to listen to anyone and anything.” – Alexander Boot, ‘Independence means greater dependence in Scottish’, 16 September 2014, http://alexanderboot.com/content/independence-means-greater-dependence-scottish

172

“Democracy is not freedom. Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to eat for lunch. Freedom comes from the recognition of certain rights which may not be taken [away from the people], not even by a 99% vote.” – Marvin Simkin, Los Angeles Times, 12 January 1992.

171

“To what extent can the state regulate every area of our lives, even our personal preferences? Should the government seek to maintain peace and public order or change human nature? The latter policy does not have a promising record.” – Ed West, The Diversity Illusion. What We Got Wrong About immigration And How To Solve It, Gibson Square, 2013, p. 175.

170

“Many people do not consciously worship God but still say they believe in him; they run the same danger of exchanging the splendour of immortal God for an idea of God which they have worked out for themselves or picked up from others; if the God they have is not the God we learn about in Jesus then it will be a God thought out by mortal man and therefore like mortal man.” – Ernest Best, The Letter of Paul to the Romans (The Cambridge Bible commentary on the New English Bible), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1967, pp. 21-22. Emphases in the original.

169

“ … a foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, of course. With consistency a great soul has nothing to do; and if we are inconsistent, it is proof enough that we are great souls.” – Theodore Dalrymple, ‘The baseness of acid’, New English Review, June 2011 (http://www.newenglishreview.org/custpage.cfm/frm/89571/sec_id/89571 )

168

“if you are a white Christian man upholding traditional family values and expressing a desire to stop immigration and leave the EU, while being sceptical of man-made global warming and believing that Darwinian evolution does not explain the origin of life on earth, Britain is no longer your country.” – Melanie Phillips, ‘I think, therefore I’m guilty’ The Spectator, 17 September 2010, http://www.melaniephillips.com/articles-new/index.php, 18 September 2010.

167

“Non-Catholics often have an image of the Catholic Church as a ruthlessly efficient organization with a chain of command that would make the armed forces jealous. The reality for most of the 1960s to 1980s was the opposite. A priest could preach heresy, profane the Holy Mass, destroy the piety of his people and face no consequences.” –  Raymond J. de Souza on the scandals that have engulfed the Roman Catholic Church, and the real reasons behind the abuses.    Father Raymond J. de Souza: ‘Culture Change in the Church’, The National post – Holy Post, 25 March 2010, http://network.nationalpost.com/NP/blogs/holy-post/archive/2010/03/25/father-raymond-j-de-souza-culture-change-in-the-church.aspx

166

“Many people do not consciously worship God but still say they believe in him; they run the same danger of exchanging the splendour of immortal God for an idea of God which they have worked out for themselves or picked up from others; if the God they have is not the God we learn about in Jesus then it will be a God thought out by mortal man and therefore like mortal man.” – Ernest Best, The Letter of Paul to the Romans (The Cambridge Bible commentary on the New English Bible), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1967, pp. 21-22. Emphases in the original.

165

“If God does not exist:

Mind is the product of the material. No thought can exist that is not the product of the material. Belief in God is a thought. Some people believe in God [therefore] The material creates thoughts that are unreliable [therefore] Thought that claims to explain the working of the universe is [ultimately] unreliable”

-Anglican Samizdat, http://www.anglicansamizdat.net/wordpress/  24 February 2010.

154

“ …the gay-marriage campaign has nothing to do with liberty and equality. Rather this is a cynical campaign of opportunistic moral grandstanding on the part of the cultural elite, which will end with gays being fobbed off with a pretty meaningless form of ‘marriage’ and married couples simultaneously finding the ancient institution they have signed up to being further drained of meaning.” – Brendan O’Neil, ‘Why gay marriage is a very bad idea’, Spiked, 22 March 2012, http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php/site/article/12273/

153

“ … since when was putting the welfare of their children ahead of parents’ own interests considered cruel and heartless? Only since society decided that children were an inconvenient obstacle to the right of parents to live lives of unfettered selfishness.” – Melanie Phillips, At last, A Judge Tells The Truth About Divorce, 30 April 2012,  http://melaniephillips.com/at-last-a-judge-tells-the-truth-about-divorce

152

“Each man and woman makes a choice to seek light or to serve self. Apart from the choice of an individual to seek the grace of God, our prayers cannot and will not wrench someone free from the grip of sin and the power of Satan”. – Tom White, The Believer’s Guide To Spiritual Warfare, Ventura (California), Regal, 2nd. Ed., 2011, p. 170.

151

“Every man has a creed, but in his soul he knows that that creed has another side, possibly not less logical, which it does not suit him to produce. Our most honest convictions are not the children of pure reason, but of temperament, environment, necessity, and interest. Most of us take sides in life and forget the one we reject. But our conscience tells us it is there, and we can on occasion state it with a fairness and fullness which proves that it is not wholly repellent to our reason.” – the (unnamed) narrator in John Buchan’s story ‘A Lucid Interval’ (1912), The Best Short Stories of John Buchan Volume 2 (ed. David Daniell), London, Panther (Granada Books), 1984, p. 54.

150

“True courage is not so much about self-glorification as it is about self-emptying: being willing to be the bridge over which others may cross to safety. It does not rest on anything so flimsy or ephemeral as “self-esteem,” but proceeds instead out of an inner integrity that knows who it is – and where it is going – and can therefore fix its gaze outward rather than inward.” – Louis Markos, On The Shoulders of Hobbits. The Road To Virtue With Tolkien And Lewis, Chicago, Moody Publishers, 2012, p. 68.

149

“Perhaps the most abrupt break has been with the special place that Christianity was previously afforded by the BBC. Christianity is now seen as one superstition among many – and no better than any other. The BBC is profoundly humanist and secular and has led public opinion in that direction.” – Robin Aitken, Can We Still Trust The BBC?, London, Bloomsbury, 2013, p. 50.  And also: “So why should good BBC liberals end up siding with a gang of merciless revanchists [the IRA]? Basically it’s a guilt-driven thing. British progressives have a strong streak of self-loathing.” .” – Robin Aitken, Can We Still Trust The BBC?, London, Bloomsbury, 2013, p. 141.

148

“A century after a civilisation loses its soul it loses its freedom
also.” – ‘Jonathan Sacks, Chief Rabbi: atheism has failed. Only religion can defeat the new barbarians’, The Spectator
[online] 15 June 2013, http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/8932301/atheism-has-failed-only-religion-can-fight-the-barbarians/

147

“it’s not democracy that governs the West these days. It’s moral relativism, abetted by PC totalitarianism”. – Alexander Boot, Gee! No, G20, 2 August 2013, http://alexanderboot.com/content/gee-no-g20

146

“There is no need to suppose that primitive mankind was perfect. The ‘fall’, as Christians call the disaster, need not have been a crash from a primitive perfection; think of it as a deviation of progress right away from the path of man’s right response to the promptings of God”. – Arthur Michael Ramsey, Introducing the Christian Faith, London, SCM Press, 1961-, pp. 26-7.

145

“Claiming that we are just ‘being true to our feelings’ in this area is just as wrong as claiming that our feelings justify any other form of sin. As Jeremiah put it ‘the heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure’ (17:9) It is God’s Word that must guide us, not our feelings.” – Peter Saunders, Evangelical Christian leaders speak of personal experience of being same-sex attracted whilst remaining committed to biblical sexual morality,  (31 August 2013), Christian Medical Comment http://pjsaunders.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/evangelical-christian-leaders-speak-of.html

154

“ …the gay-marriage campaign has nothing to do with liberty and equality. Rather this is a cynical campaign of opportunistic moral grandstanding on the part of the cultural elite, which will end with gays being fobbed off with a pretty meaningless form of ‘marriage’ and married couples simultaneously finding the ancient institution they have signed up to being further drained of meaning.” – Brendan O’Neil, ‘Why gay marriage is a very bad idea’, Spiked, 22 March 2012, http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php/site/article/12273/

153

“ … since when was putting the welfare of their children ahead of parents’ own interests considered cruel and heartless? Only since society decided that children were an inconvenient obstacle to the right of parents to live lives of unfettered selfishness.” – Melanie Phillips, At last, A Judge Tells The Truth About Divorce, 30 April 2012,  http://melaniephillips.com/at-last-a-judge-tells-the-truth-about-divorce

152

“Each man and woman makes a choice to seek light or to serve self. Apart from the choice of an individual to seek the grace of God, our prayers cannot and will not wrench someone free from the grip of sin and the power of Satan”. – Tom White, The Believer’s Guide To Spiritual Warfare, Ventura (California), Regal, 2nd. Ed., 2011, p. 170.

151

“Every man has a creed, but in his soul he knows that that creed has another side, possibly not less logical, which it does not suit him to produce. Our most honest convictions are not the children of pure reason, but of temperament, environment, necessity, and interest. Most of us take sides in life and forget the one we reject. But our conscience tells us it is there, and we can on occasion state it with a fairness and fullness which proves that it is not wholly repellent to our reason.” – the (unnamed) narrator in John Buchan’s story ‘A Lucid Interval’ (1912), The Best Short Stories of John Buchan Volume 2 (ed. David Daniell), London, Panther (Granada Books), 1984, p. 54.

150

“True courage is not so much about self-glorification as it is about self-emptying: being willing to be the bridge over which others may cross to safety. It does not rest on anything so flimsy or ephemeral as “self-esteem,” but proceeds instead out of an inner integrity that knows who it is – and where it is going – and can therefore fix its gaze outward rather than inward.” – Louis Markos, On The Shoulders of Hobbits. The Road To Virtue With Tolkien And Lewis, Chicago, Moody Publishers, 2012, p. 68.

149

“Perhaps the most abrupt break has been with the special place that Christianity was previously afforded by the BBC. Christianity is now seen as one superstition among many – and no better than any other. The BBC is profoundly humanist and secular and has led public opinion in that direction.” – Robin Aitken, Can We Still Trust The BBC?, London, Bloomsbury, 2013, p. 50.  And also: “So why should good BBC liberals end up siding with a gang of merciless revanchists [the IRA]? Basically it’s a guilt-driven thing. British progressives have a strong streak of self-loathing.” .” – Robin Aitken, Can We Still Trust The BBC?, London, Bloomsbury, 2013, p. 141.

148

“A century after a civilisation loses its soul it loses its freedom
also.” – ‘Jonathan Sacks, Chief Rabbi: atheism has failed. Only religion can defeat the new barbarians’, The Spectator
[online] 15 June 2013, http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/8932301/atheism-has-failed-only-religion-can-fight-the-barbarians/

147

“it’s not democracy that governs the West these days. It’s moral relativism, abetted by PC totalitarianism”. – Alexander Boot, Gee! No, G20, 2 August 2013, http://alexanderboot.com/content/gee-no-g20

146

“There is no need to suppose that primitive mankind was perfect. The ‘fall’, as Christians call the disaster, need not have been a crash from a primitive perfection; think of it as a deviation of progress right away from the path of man’s right response to the promptings of God”. – Arthur Michael Ramsey, Introducing the Christian Faith, London, SCM Press, 1961-, pp. 26-7.

145

“Claiming that we are just ‘being true to our feelings’ in this area is just as wrong as claiming that our feelings justify any other form of sin. As Jeremiah put it ‘the heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure’ (17:9) It is God’s Word that must guide us, not our feelings.” – Peter Saunders, Evangelical Christian leaders speak of personal experience of being same-sex attracted whilst remaining committed to biblical sexual morality,  (31 August 2013), Christian Medical Comment http://pjsaunders.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/evangelical-christian-leaders-speak-of.html

144

“The fool is disturbed not when they tell him that his ideas are false, but when they suggest that they have gone out of style.” – attributed to Nicolás Gómez Dávila.

143

“ … everyone knows, if he stops to think about it, that no matter how disturbed the mind is, however joyous or despairing – active, in a word – there is a part of it that is always detached and unmoved; it observes quietly what is happening. Two passages in No. 10 lay bare this part of the mind, so essential to sanity …” – musicologist/composer Robert Simpson in his sleeve-note (1973) to Havergal Brian’s Symphony No. 10, London, Unicorn Records, 1973; Unicorn-Kanachana, 1990.

142

“Homosexual Western clergy should stop behaving like teenage girls whose feelings have been hurt, grow up, muster a smidgen of humility and do the job they claim God has called them to do. Or they should quit and find a job where they don’t have to lie about their sex lives.” – David Jenkins (in his blog Anglican Samizdat, entry for 7 January 2013, ‘Homosexual priests advised to lie about their celibacy’ http://www.anglicansamizdat.net/wordpress/ ,) commenting on the recent Church of England decision concerning bishops in civil partnerships, and subsequent advice to lie about their celibacy.

141

“God does not want a man to be too calm, so He gives him unrest to discipline him, or rather He makes him give it to himself …” – Abbot Gregorius in Thomas Mann’s The Holy Sinner (1951) (translation of H. T. Lowe-Porter), Penguin, 1961, p. 55.

140

“Those people who will not be governed by God will be ruled by tyrants,” – attributed to William Penn.

139

“When you don’t love people you’re only a few steps away from manipulating them” – Bob and Debby Gass with Ruth Haliday, The Word For Today, entry for 28 February 2013 (United Christian Broadcasters).

138

“Much that passes for idealism is disguised love of power” – attributed to Bertrand Russell.

137

“Societies which do not believe in hell pretty quickly find hell springing up all around them” – Peter Hitchens, Just for Once, Please Argue With What I Actually Said, 23 September 2013, http://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/

136

‘Resentment is like taking poison and hoping the other person dies’ (attributed to Augustine of Hippo).

135

“When the Church calls God love, or grace, or mercy, she is not subscribing to the vapid doctrine that all we mean by God is the presence of these qualities, wherever they happen to appear, in the world. No, God is God even though there were no world to reflect his goodness.” – Austin Farrer, Said or Sung, London, The Faith Press, 1960, pp. 106-7.

124

“… since it is even more important to do what we can to prevent the perversion of Christians than to effect the conversion of secularists, we must discuss the claim of those modernists who reject the miracles in general and the Resurrection in particular, to call themselves Christians. Modernist Christianity of this extreme variety is not a genuine religion. It is a pis aller [last resort] for those who have lost their faith and are reluctant for emotional, or perhaps in the case of some ecclesiastics also for practical reasons, to break with Christianity.” – Sir Arnold Lunn in Arnold Lunn and Garth Lean, Christian Counter-Attack, London, Blandford Press, 1969, p. 115.

123

“Were Christianity of human invention, men could scarcely have conceived anything more calculated to render themselves miserable. For this faith asks them to give, and give, and give; to be hurt, to be disciplined, to be knocked into shape by the hammer-blows of suffering and deprivation.” – Brother James in Harry Blamires’s The Kirkbride Conversations. Six Dialogues of the Christian Faith, London, SPCK, 1958, pp. 34-5.

122

“…foolish preachers, by always telling you how much Christianity will help you and how good it is for society, have actually led you to forget that Christianity is not a patent medicine. Christianity claims to give an account of the facts – to tell you what the real universe is like. … If Christianity is untrue, then no honest man will want to believe it, however helpful it might be: if it is true, every honest man will want to believe it, even if it gives him no help at all.” – C. S. Lewis, “Man or rabbit?”, 1946(?), 1971, etc.

121

“You can sit in a garage all day and call yourself a car, but that doesn’t make you one nor does it make your pronouncements about either cars or garages scientifically accurate” – Creation scientist Tom Willis, when asked about the many Christians (Catholic and Protestant) who are “perfectly at ease” with evolution; “Take me to your leader”, New Scientist (London), 22 April 1999, p. 42.

120

“Betrayal [of Christians, in the mid-20th century] came from their own educated ranks as some in leadership succumbed to and even joined forces with sceptics, giving strength to the tentacles of secularism to gradually choke out religious life. Secularizing voices among the clergy berated the conservative authorities in institutions for not giving free vent to those of liberal stripe. Once that openness was granted and liberals had gained power, those same voices countered with greater bigotry to block out any conservative view.” – Ravi Zacharias, Deliver Us From Evil. Restoring the Soul in a Disintegrating Culture, Dallas, World Publishing, 1996, p. 52.

119

“Many of the religious orders … the supposed power-houses of meditative and contemplative prayer, are teaching techniques that owe more to Krishna than to Christ. Many books are being published that attempt not only to blur but even to deny the differences that exist between Christian and non-Christian Eastern thought. … Many Christians today (including not a few bishops) find themselves embarrassed by claims of uniqueness attaching to the person of Christ, and yet paradoxically they maintain that the Lord is somehow special. The problem is that they are just no longer very sure why.” – Lynda Rose, No Other Gods, London, Spire (Hodder & Stoughton), 1990, pp. 28, 29.

118

“The contemporary celebration of the body and of sexual feelings is typical of any nature religion in which ‘natural’ equals ‘good’. … Whatever one’s body is naturally inclined toward is believed to be right, for the body is part of Nature. Whenever the human mind, the human conscience or human society … objects to the body’s inclinations, this is deemed wrong. This is because mind, conscience and society are all part of Man, an untrustworthy being, while body is part of Nature, which may be trusted. This kind of ultimately religious thinking lies behind much of the scientific effort to disentangle the influences of the environment (human) from heredity (natural) on human behaviour”. – J. A. Walter, The Human Home. The Myth of the Sacred Environment, Tring, Lion, 1982, pp. 32-3.

117

“… seeking is only serious if the seeker is following some clue, has some intuition of what it is he seeks, and is willing to commit himself or herself to following that clue, that intuition. Merely wandering around in a clueless twilight is not seeking. The relativism which is not willing to speak about truth but only about “what is true for me” is an evasion of the serious business of living. It is the mark of a tragic loss of nerve in our contemporary culture. It is a preliminary symptom of death.” – Lesslie Newbigin, The Gospel in a Pluralist Society, London, SPCK, 5th impression, 1994, p. 22.

116

“The humanists pretend to esteem the human being above all else. In reality, as the Humanist Manifesto II [1973] shows, the humanist takes away all worth from mankind. Unless our worth is rooted and grounded in something objective, and outside ourselves, we are of value only to ourselves, and can never rise above the impermanence of our own short lives. The God of Christianity is outside our finite and transitory universe and His love for us gives us a value which transcends not only ourselves but our finite universe as well.” – Josh McDowell and Don Stewart, Understanding Secular Religions, San Bernardino, California, Here’s Life Publishers Inc., 1982, pp. 83-4.

115

“… no great moral structure like the Early Church, based as it was upon lifelong persecution and personal suffering, could have reared its head upon a statement which every one of the eleven apostles knew to be a lie. … Whatever the explanation of these extraordinary events [after Jesus’ death] may be, we may be certain that it was not that.” – Frank Morison on the alleged deception of the apostles’ claims of Jesus’ resurrection, in Who Moved the Stone?, London, Faber, 1930, 1958, 1962, 1963, etc., etc., p. 89.

124

“… since it is even more important to do what we can to prevent the perversion of Christians than to effect the conversion of secularists, we must discuss the claim of those modernists who reject the miracles in general and the Resurrection in particular, to call themselves Christians. Modernist Christianity of this extreme variety is not a genuine religion. It is a pis aller [last resort] for those who have lost their faith and are reluctant for emotional, or perhaps in the case of some ecclesiastics also for practical reasons, to break with Christianity.” – Sir Arnold Lunn in Arnold Lunn and Garth Lean, Christian Counter-Attack, London, Blandford Press, 1969, p. 115.

123

“Were Christianity of human invention, men could scarcely have conceived anything more calculated to render themselves miserable. For this faith asks them to give, and give, and give; to be hurt, to be disciplined, to be knocked into shape by the hammer-blows of suffering and deprivation.” – Brother James in Harry Blamires’s The Kirkbride Conversations. Six Dialogues of the Christian Faith, London, SPCK, 1958, pp. 34-5.

122

“…foolish preachers, by always telling you how much Christianity will help you and how good it is for society, have actually led you to forget that Christianity is not a patent medicine. Christianity claims to give an account of the facts – to tell you what the real universe is like. … If Christianity is untrue, then no honest man will want to believe it, however helpful it might be: if it is true, every honest man will want to believe it, even if it gives him no help at all.” – C. S. Lewis, “Man or rabbit?”, 1946(?), 1971, etc.

121

“You can sit in a garage all day and call yourself a car, but that doesn’t make you one nor does it make your pronouncements about either cars or garages scientifically accurate” – Creation scientist Tom Willis, when asked about the many Christians (Catholic and Protestant) who are “perfectly at ease” with evolution; “Take me to your leader”, New Scientist (London), 22 April 1999, p. 42.

120

“Betrayal [of Christians, in the mid-20th century] came from their own educated ranks as some in leadership succumbed to and even joined forces with sceptics, giving strength to the tentacles of secularism to gradually choke out religious life. Secularizing voices among the clergy berated the conservative authorities in institutions for not giving free vent to those of liberal stripe. Once that openness was granted and liberals had gained power, those same voices countered with greater bigotry to block out any conservative view.” – Ravi Zacharias, Deliver Us From Evil. Restoring the Soul in a Disintegrating Culture, Dallas, World Publishing, 1996, p. 52.

119

“Many of the religious orders … the supposed power-houses of meditative and contemplative prayer, are teaching techniques that owe more to Krishna than to Christ. Many books are being published that attempt not only to blur but even to deny the differences that exist between Christian and non-Christian Eastern thought. … Many Christians today (including not a few bishops) find themselves embarrassed by claims of uniqueness attaching to the person of Christ, and yet paradoxically they maintain that the Lord is somehow special. The problem is that they are just no longer very sure why.” – Lynda Rose, No Other Gods, London, Spire (Hodder & Stoughton), 1990, pp. 28, 29.

118

“The contemporary celebration of the body and of sexual feelings is typical of any nature religion in which ‘natural’ equals ‘good’. … Whatever one’s body is naturally inclined toward is believed to be right, for the body is part of Nature. Whenever the human mind, the human conscience or human society … objects to the body’s inclinations, this is deemed wrong. This is because mind, conscience and society are all part of Man, an untrustworthy being, while body is part of Nature, which may be trusted. This kind of ultimately religious thinking lies behind much of the scientific effort to disentangle the influences of the environment (human) from heredity (natural) on human behaviour”. – J. A. Walter, The Human Home. The Myth of the Sacred Environment, Tring, Lion, 1982, pp. 32-3.

117

“… seeking is only serious if the seeker is following some clue, has some intuition of what it is he seeks, and is willing to commit himself or herself to following that clue, that intuition. Merely wandering around in a clueless twilight is not seeking. The relativism which is not willing to speak about truth but only about “what is true for me” is an evasion of the serious business of living. It is the mark of a tragic loss of nerve in our contemporary culture. It is a preliminary symptom of death.” – Lesslie Newbigin, The Gospel in a Pluralist Society, London, SPCK, 5th impression, 1994, p. 22.

116

“The humanists pretend to esteem the human being above all else. In reality, as the Humanist Manifesto II [1973] shows, the humanist takes away all worth from mankind. Unless our worth is rooted and grounded in something objective, and outside ourselves, we are of value only to ourselves, and can never rise above the impermanence of our own short lives. The God of Christianity is outside our finite and transitory universe and His love for us gives us a value which transcends not only ourselves but our finite universe as well.” – Josh McDowell and Don Stewart, Understanding Secular Religions, San Bernardino, California, Here’s Life Publishers Inc., 1982, pp. 83-4.

115

“… no great moral structure like the Early Church, based as it was upon lifelong persecution and personal suffering, could have reared its head upon a statement which every one of the eleven apostles knew to be a lie. … Whatever the explanation of these extraordinary events [after Jesus’ death] may be, we may be certain that it was not that.” – Frank Morison on the alleged deception of the apostles’ claims of Jesus’ resurrection, in Who Moved the Stone?, London, Faber, 1930, 1958, 1962, 1963, etc., etc., p. 89.

114

“Who that is honest surveying the happenings of recent decades – the millions and millions who have been killed or uprooted from their homes, the wanton destruction, the almost inconceivable cruelties of a Hitler and a Stalin, the crazed quest for wealth and excitement – can seriously maintain that we are moving forwards spiritually, morally or even materially? … The trouble with all earthly quests, however admirable they may be in intent, however earnestly promoted by their advocates, is that they are liable to triumph.” – Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus Rediscovered, London, Fontana, 1969, 1974, p. 108.

113

“For man, spiritual being as he is, cannot rest in, or upon, a mere morality or ethical code. As the Confucians grafted a later form of Buddhism upon their morality in order to satisfy their innate demand for gods to worship, so the Englishman seeks an outlet for the spiritual and mystical tendencies of his nature, and too often finds it in some pseudo-religion, which is at bottom irrational and anti-Christian, though the latter fact is skilfully disguised by the use of Christian language and sentiments.” – Bede Frost, Some Modern Substitutes for Christianity, London and Oxford, Mowbrays, 1942, 1949, p. 13.

112

“The apparent difference between the “mystical” New Age view and the agnostic Secular Humanist view is no real difference at all. Both viewpoints are in perfect agreement in believing that nature is everything and we don’t need God. Each exalts both human achievement and scientific progress. Each makes man a god, answerable only to himself.” – Randy England, The Unicorn in the Sanctuary. The Impact of the New Age on the Catholic Church, Rockford, Illinois, Tan Books and Publishers, Inc., 1990, p. 138.

111

“One of the greatest moments of growth in prayer arrives the day I can as it were walk away from my feelings, discount them completely. People fret because they don’t ‘feel’ God is close, or even that God has ‘deserted’ them. … Being poor in spirit is being happy with this state, happy as a rational creature to surrender oneself trustingly to this hiddenness” – Delia Smith, A Journey Into God, London, Spire (Hodder & Stoughton), 1988, p. 220.

110

“The Catholic church believed that man and God both had a sort of spiritual freedom. Calvinism took away the freedom from man but left it to God. Scientific materialism binds the Creator Himself; it chains up God as the Apocalypse chained the devil. It leaves nothing free in the universe. And those who assist this process are called the “liberal theologians”. – G. K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy, 1908; reproduced: London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1996, p. 189.

109

“… recently many have come to doubt that human reason can supply the missing transcendent standard by which differing human moral beliefs can be evaluated. From a scientific standpoint, morality – like religion – is a matter of subjective belief rather than objective knowledge. That makes it effectively a matter of personal preference. This does not mean that moral codes will cease to exist … but it does mean that those codes will be grounded on the preferences of local power holders rather than on universal principles of reason and knowledge. What is right or wrong depends on the preference of whoever has the power to impose his will.” – Phillip E. Johnson, The Right Questions. Truth, Meaning & Public Debate, Downers Grove, Illinois, InterVarsity Press, 2002, p. 45-6.

108

“… what is the basis for any moral complaint about what Hitler did to the Jews if God does not exist? In a godless universe, what one ‘animal’ does to another ‘animal’ is ethically irrelevant, and there is no moral basis for anger or outrage against anything. Whatever happens, and that is all there is to it.” – John Blanchard, Does God Believe in Atheists?, Darlington (England), Evangelical Press, 2000, p. 521.

107

“In other words [according to Arthur Leff, of the Yale Law School; an atheist], only if there is a God who is Himself ultimate Goodness and Justice is there any ultimate moral grounding for the law. And if there is no God, Leff argues, then nothing and no one can take His place. Nothing else can function as the grounding of morality – no person, no group, no document – because all of these can be challenged. All of these are susceptible to the defiant challenge you hear kids say to their parents or on the playground: “Sez who?” Everything except an infinite God is susceptible, he says, to “the grand sez who?” “ – Nancy R. Pearcey, “Why Darwinism Matters”, (Washington DC Policy Briefing, 10 May 2000), Access Research Network, Nancy Pearcey Files

106

“The notion that strong sexual attraction can’t possibly be withstood is one of the most fashionable fairy tales of our present culture. The reality is we can say no as well as yes – God gives us free will, not biological slavery” – Rev. Lewis Hall, in Susan Howatch’s novel The Heartbreaker, London, Little, Brown, 2003, p. 249.

105

“The different claims of different religions constitute a real problem which cannot be glossed over by any simplistic talk that of course all religions are really saying the same thing. They are not. Sometimes they offer alternative, mutually exclusive, ways of viewing the world. … Any religion, like Christianity, that claims to be true, need not give up that claim just because there are rival claimants to the truth, with apparently different standards of what constitutes rational justification for it.” – Richard Harries, The Real God. A Response to Anthony Freeman’s God in Us, London, Mowbray, 1994, pp. 72, 73.

104

“The proper combination of faith and obedience can be summed up in one word: holiness. Holiness means being so much full of God that there is no room for anything else. That means that we no longer love the world or the things of the world such as the lust of the eyes and the pride of life. Instead of doing the things of the world, a holy person does the will of God.” – Peter C. Wagner, “Spiritual Warfare”, in the book Territorial Spirits, edited by him, Chichester, England, Sovereign World Ltd., 1991, p. 8-9.

103

“The intellectual forces of the Christian Church need to be mobilized in answer to a movement whose leaders are involved … in nothing less than the decomposition of our civilization. It is time to submit the half-truths and sly insinuations of the new anti-Christian establishment to ruthless scrutiny. We need to analyze the machinery of discourse by which it operates. … If we do so, we shall discover that the more deeply we dig down through the slogans and the verbiage, the emptier the supposed foundations of fashionable liberal relativism will be seen to be.” – Harry Blamires, The Post-Christian Mind, London, SPCK, 2001, p. 1.

102

“I have seen pictures of Eichmann and Hitler and people like that, and I’m sure there are thousands of those like that today that I believe are dominated by evil. But even that I think is a power outside themselves. I’ve seen on the television screen some of those people that I think are evil, but I think there’s a supernatural evil power that’s dominating them. And in Jesus’ day they would call it demon possession. …we’re all born with a tendency to evil within us, of hate and lust and greed, and that’s called original sin.” (Billy Graham) – David Frost, Billy Graham in Conversation, Oxford, Lion Publishing, 1997, p. 108.

101

“… if all are agreed that love is a good thing, then why not ‘the more of it the merrier’? Why not free love all round? … The answer is that random sex is self-destructive. … The great adventure of Western civilization has brought us on a fool’s errand through nothing more fertile than sage brush desert and dry plain, to deposit us in a dreary township, or to a shack in an industrial slum. Abandoning God and the traditional virtues, we follow a mirage of freedom into the wilderness littered with concrete and chromium-plated motels from which there is no escape except through fantasy, insanity and death.” – Michael Green on sexual “freedom”, (as seen in Vladimir Nabokov’s novel Lolita), Jesus Spells Freedom, London, Inter-Varsity Press, 1972, pp. 66, 67.

100

“… the so-called “historical-critical method” [of Biblical criticism] … is not an open-minded inductive study of the evidence. Rather, ancient literature is studied and past events reconstructed with certain rigid presuppositions of what could or could not have happened. This is done, however, in the name of scientific objectivity. … This positivistic or naturalistic view of history is not an element of Christian tradition but a product of the rationalism of the Enlightenment. It results from trying to treat history as though it were a natural science. … … in fact, only the “hypothesis” of [Jesus’] actual bodily resurrection adequately explains the known facts. The only reason for not accepting the “biblical hypothesis” is the conviction that it cannot be true -i.e., to have a closed mind to a real possibility.” – George Eldon Ladd, I believe in the Resurrection of Jesus, London, Hodder and Stoughton, 1975, pp. 23, 140 (author’s italics).

99

“It is no use our saying ‘I believe God is love, but I do not believe in his wrath.’ How do we know, we know nothing about God. We would not know that he was love were it not that we are told it. But the book that tells us that God is love also tells us that God hates sin and is going to punish it. We either take it all or reject it all. We cannot bring our minds in at certain points, and reason here and there. That is what people are doing today, and there is no gospel left and the churches are being emptied. I am not surprised. All hell is being let loose, and it will get worse.” – Martyn Lloyd-Jones, I am Not Ashamed. Advice to Timothy [sermons preached in 1964], London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1986, pp. 48 and 49.

98

“There is in Anglicanism a strong rationalistic and moralistic tradition of thought, going back beyond [19th] century liberalism to the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Latitudinarians … , and beyond this to the Platonism of the Renaissance. Its habit is to assume that all human beings naturally aspire towards God and goodness, to treat the moral and religious intuitions of educated people as ultimate certainties, and to take seriously only those elements of biblical teaching that fit in with them. Naturally, those who stand in this tradition concentrate on ethics, soft-pedal the themes of sin and grace, and tend constantly to endorse in practice the … doctrine of salvation by sincerity … It is this tradition which has led to the taunt that Pelagianism – salvation by moral effort alone – is the Englishman’s special heresy!” – J. I. Packer, God Has Spoken, London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1965, 1979, 1993, 1998, p. 60.

97

“… segmentation of the concept of truth is completely alien to historic Christianity, which teaches that spiritual truths are firmly rooted in historical events. Paul went so far as to say that if Christ’s resurrection had not happened in real history … then our faith would be worthless [1 Corinthians 15] … Of course, the Resurrection is not only an historical event; it also has profound and far-reaching spiritual implications. But the point is that the two are not partitioned off from one another: An event that did not occur can have no spiritual implications.” – Nancy Pearcey, Total Truth. Liberating Christianity from its Cultural Captivity, Wheaton, Illinois, Crossway Books, 2004, p. 116.

96

“It is a common assumption that, in order to survive, churches must accommodate to the age. But in fact, the opposite is true: In every historical period, the religious groups that grow most rapidly are those that set believers at odds with the surrounding culture. As a general principle, the higher a group’s tension with mainstream society, the higher its growth rate.” – Nancy Pearcey, Total Truth. Liberating Christianity from its Cultural Captivity, Wheaton, Illinois, Crossway Books, 2004, p. 261.

95

“Satanism is a blatantly selfish, brutal philosophy. It is based on the belief that human beings are inherently selfish, violent creatures, that life is a Darwinian struggle for survival of the fittest, that only the strong survive and the earth will be ruled by those who fight to win the ceaseless competition that exists in all jungles – including those of urbanized society. Abhor this brutal outlook if you will; it is based, as it has been for centuries, on real conditions that exist in the world we inhabit rather than the mystical lands of milk and honey depicted in the Christian Bible”. – Burton H. Wolfe’s Introduction to Anton Szandor LaVey, The Satanic Bible, Avon Books (HarperCollins), New York, 1969, p. [18] (This is the book which inspired a man (October 2004) to declare himself a Satanist, and be allowed to practice Satanic rituals in his place of work (a British warship), permission being granted in compliance with the official policies of his employer, the Royal Navy).

94

“Having destroyed the family, which for all its defects had the capacity to prize and shelter old people, the humanistic cult of progress thoughtfully showers us with more old people [by way of health care programmes] – people for whom no invented institutions can really provide. The ultimate irony of humanism is that it has produced such a viciously inhuman world.” – David Ehrenfeld, The Arrogance of Humanism, New York, Oxford, etc., Oxford University Press, 1981, p. 92.

93

“The Bible as well as all the revelations claimed in other religions merely acts as a signpost to show us the way to God. Jesus is himself the way. We not only discover the way to God through him, but we also find God in him for he is God. He not only reveals; he is the revelation.”- Martin Goldsmith, What About Other Faiths? Is Jesus Christ the Only Way to God?, London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1989, 2002, p. 43.

92

“Failure is the end of almost every good beginning. God himself had to contend with it almost immediately after creation. But that did not stop him from continuing on, determined to finish what he started. Perhaps the greatest temptation of all is to surrender when our plans fail, but in retrospect it is almost always possible to see how initial disappointments and failures led in the end to a greater success than we had initially believed possible.” – Mark Eddy Smith, A Closer Look at The Lord of the Rings, Eastbourne, Kingsway Publications, 2002, p. 59.

91

“As a church we no longer believe (on the whole) that things can be reversed if only we pray for revival, or if only we focus on evangelism, or if only we reshape the liturgy, or if only we all use the same evangelistic programmes …” – Stephen Croft, “Negotiating tensions”, in The Future of Ministry. Looking Ahead 25 Years, ed. Gavin Wakefield, Grove Pastoral Series, Grove Books, Cambridge (England), 2004, p. 5.

90

“The most insidious error of our severe philosophical theologians is to set aside the life to come as a thing indifferent, a matter of no concern, which Christians may or may not believe. What? Do we see God in this life? Is it a matter of no concern, a thing indifferent, whether we are ever to attain our only end?” – Austin Farrer, in The End of Man, London, SPCK, 1973, p. 4.

89

“Atheism … will never accept responsibility. Militant atheists certainly will never say, ‘We have dictated the moral shape of society for nearly half a century, and what we now see is the failure of our disastrously wrong assumptions about the moral nature of human beings’. … Atheism has taken over the media, the entertainment industry, the education of teachers, and the caring professions. The full price to be paid in future years in social consequences cannot be imagined.” – Peter Masters, in The Cruelties of Atheism, London, Sword & Trowel (Metropolitan Tabernacle), 1994, 1998, pp. 7, 12.

88

“There are approximately two hundred and fifty political ‘nations’ in the world today. Christians are under pressure in all but about thirty, and that number shrinks annually. Churches everywhere need to prepare their members for suffering and sacrifice.” – David Pawson, in Explaining the Second Coming, Sovereign World, Trowbridge, England, 1993, pp. 23-4.

87

“The first letter of John (3.8) tells us that the Son of God appeared for the very purpose of undoing the devil’s work … The devil’s work is manifold, and not all of it is obvious. The occult is but a small part of his empire …“ “Occultism covers a very wide field … It is not ‘religion’, not even ‘false religion’, but fringe science or alternative science. The true occultist is not worshipping anything (not even Satan) but is trying to use secret powers to his own advantage.” – Deliverance. Psychic disturbances and occult involvement (report of the Christian Deliverance Study Group (Church of England)), ed. Michael Perry, London, SPCK, 2nd. ed., 1996, pp. ix, 60.

86

“… the phrase ‘authority of scripture’ can only make Christian sense if it is a shorthand for ‘the authority of the triune God, exercised somehow through scripture’.” – N.T.Wright in Scripture and the Authority of God, London, SPCK, 2005, p. 17.

85

“… Sir Isaac Newton was … actually an alchemist, and … by far the greater part of his writings was devoted to alchemy and interpreting the Book of Revelation. We choose to ignore the truth about the history of natural philosophy. It doesn’t fit into the story of human progress as we like to tell it.” – Terry Jones and Alan Ereira in Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives, London, BBC Books, 2004, p. 134, writing about the myth of Newton’s revelation of the reality of physical nature and its laws, as in Alexander Pope’s famous epitaph.

84

“Now if I’d seen him, really there, really alive, it’d be like a fever. If I thought there was some god who really did care two hoots about people, who wanted ‘em like a father and cared for ‘em like a mother … well you wouldn’t catch me sayin’ things like “There are two sides to every question”, and “We must respect other people’s beliefs”. You wouldn’t find me just being gen’rally nice in the hope that it’d all turn out alright in the end, not if the flame was burning in me like an unforgivin’ sword …” – Granny Weatherwax, in Terry Pratchett’s novel Carpe Jugulum, London, Corgi Books, 1999, p. 349.

83

“The obsession with ‘community’ … manifests itself in several ways. The most obvious is in the language of the new liturgies. In a deliberate attempt to return to the consciousness of the Early Church, the Creed no longer begins ‘I believe …’ but ‘We believe …’ … It is a translation justified by theology and history, but not by practice, for even in post-Vatican-II Rome it is still ‘Credo…’ [I believe] and the most superficial knowledge of Anglicans suggests that each person believes something very different from his neighbour and chooses which portions of Christian doctrine he is able to accept for himself.” – Gavin Stamp in The Church in Crisis, by Charles Moore, A. N. Wilson and Gavin Stamp, London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1986, p. 141.

82

“If you do not believe in a personal God the question: ‘What is the purpose of life?’ is unaskable and unanswerable. To whom or what would you address the question?” – J. R. R. Tolkien, in a letter to a young person quoted by Joseph Pearce in Tolkien: Man and Myth. A Literary Life, London, HarperCollins, 1998, 1999, p. 211.

81

“But the more important battle, as shown in [the Book of] Job, takes place inside us. Will we trust God? Job teaches us that at the moment when faith is hardest and least likely, then faith is most needed. His struggle presents a glimpse of what the Bible elsewhere spells out in detail: the remarkable truth that our choices matter, not just to us and our own destiny but, amazingly, to God himself and the universe he rules.” – Philip Yancey, Disappointment With God. Three Questions No One Asks Aloud [Is God unfair? Is God silent? Is God hidden?], Grand Rapids, Michigan, Zondervan, 1988, 1992, p. 200.

80

“Now there suddenly broke in on him like a sunrise a sense of God’s mercy – deeper than the fore-ordination of things, like a great mercifulness … Surely, surely, behind the reign of law and the coercion of power there was a deep purpose of mercy.” – Edward Leithen’s re-discovery of God’s love, in John Buchan’s novel Sick Heart River (US: Mountain Meadow), London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1941, p. 203.

79

“The orthodox Faith makes no pretence of appealing to human reason as its ultimate justification. It insists indeed that it is inherently and fundamentally reasonable, but also that this reasonableness can only be seen by the perfect and infinite Intelligence who is God. Its acceptance by human beings has always ultimately rested upon their conviction that it is revealed by God, but it is confirmed by the fact that it gives a meaning to human life that nothing else can provide.” – E. L. Mascall, The God-Man, Westminster, Dacre Press, 1940, pp. 39-40.

78

“Sometimes I think that we talk a little too glibly about Christ’s work in our lives. To really believe that the Lord from heaven is at work in our tiny little life is either arrogant nonsense or magnificent truth. A convinced Christian, of course, rules out the nonsense theory and is locked in to the truth theory. But to take this lightly is to do a massive truth grave injustice” – Stuart Briscoe, Bound for Joy. Philippians – Paul’s Letter from Prison, Ventura, California, Regal Books, 1975, 1984, p. 15.

77

“Spirituality has become the acceptable face of religion. It offers a language for the divine that dispenses with all the off-putting paraphernalia of priests and church. And it’s not about believing in anything too specific, other than in some nebulous sense of otherness or presence. It offers God without dogma. … Yes, spirituality is religion that has been mugged by capitalism.” – Giles Fraser, God’s Been MuggedThe Giles Fraser Column, Ekklesia web site.

76

“The final opening of the Soviet archives in the 1990s led to revelations that ended any notion that atheism was quite as gracious, gentle, and generous a worldview as some of its more idealistic supporters believed. … One of the greatest ironies of the twentieth century is that many of the most deplorable acts of murder, intolerance, and repression were carried out by those who thought that religion was murderous, intolerant, and repressive – and thus sought to remove it from the face of the planet as a humanitarian act.” – Alister McGrath, Dawkins’ God. Genes, Memes, and the Meaning of Life, Oxford (etc.), Blackwell, 2005, pp. 113-4.

75

“Trying to do the Lord’s work in your own strength is the most confusing, exhausting and tedious of all work. But when you are filled with the Holy Spirit, then the ministry of Jesus just flows out of you.” – Corrie ten Boom, as quoted in a feature on the famous Dutch Christian, on the ReJesus site: http://www.rejesus.co.uk/the_story/saint/saint8/quotes.html

74

“It is a tragic fact that in our present society we believe more in the destructive power of negative thinking than in the liberating truth of God’s love. Bitterness and cynicism are the gods of our age. … Often we totally lack any sense of self-awareness and responsibility. We love to put the onus for our lack of spiritual progress onto others or even onto God.” – Tracy Williamson, Expecting God to Speak to You, Chichester, West Sussex, New Wine Press, 2005, p. 81.

73

“The aim of the religious quest, like the scientific quest, is to seek motivated belief about what is the case. … religion can only be of real value if it’s actually true. … Religion is not just a technique for keeping our spirits up, a pious anaesthetic to dull some of the pain of real life. The central religious question is the question of truth. Of course, religion can sustain us in life, or at the approach of death, but it can only do so if it is about the way things really are.” – John Polkinghorne, Quarks, Chaos and Christianity. Questions to Science and Religion, London, SPCK, 1994, 2005, pp. 9, 95.

72

“ … there are those who set their own judgement about what is right and wrong against that of the Bible or the Church or, indeed, any other outside authority. They say that things have changed since the days the Scriptures were written, that social conditions have changed, and that we must not be bound by the conventions of the past. Each person, they would say, must judge for himself what is right or wrong for him. … The more one reads the Old Testament, let alone the New Testament, the plainer it appears that human nature has not changed much over the centuries and that the underlying motives of men are the same now as then; the basic elements of right and wrong have not changed, and the task of man is not to decide but to discover the moral law.” – Robert Martineau, Moments that Matter, London, SPCK, 1976, p. 48.

71

“… the arguments from reason do provide some substantial reasons for preferring theism to naturalism. The “problem of reason” is a huge problem for naturalism, as serious or, I would say, more serious, than the problem of evil is for theists. But while theists have expended considerable effort in confronting the problem of evil, the problem of reason has not as yet been acknowledged as a serious problem for naturalism” – Victor Reppert, C. S. Lewis’s Dangerous Idea. In Defense of the Argument from Reason, Downers Grove, Illinois, InterVarsity Press, 2003, p. 128.

70

“The bishop who feels a call to evangelism should call evangelists and give them a task and the authority to carry it out, rather than waiting until the annual diocesan convention to ask that a committee be appointed representing the diversity of the diocese, which will bring back a report to the next convention, including a study of the budgetary implications for its proposals and a coordinated multi-step phased-in implementation plan.” – David Mills, in his article ‘Reorganizing Religion. Why the Church Bureaucracies Have to Go’, published in Touchstone. A Journal of Mere Christianity, September 2004; available electronically at: http://touchstonemag.com/archives/article.php?id=17-07-039-f

69

“Take away the hope of arrival and our [spiritual] journey becomes the Battan death march. The best human life is unspeakably sad. Even if we manage to escape some of the bigger tragedies (and few of us do), life rarely matches our expectations. When we do get a taste of what we really long for, it never lasts. Every vacation eventually comes to an end. Friends move away. Our careers don’t quite pan out. Sadly, we feel guilty about our disappointment, as though we ought to be more grateful. / Of course we’re disappointed – we’re made for so much more. ‘He has also set eternity in our hearts,’ (Eccl. 3:11). – Brent Curtis and John Eldredge, The Sacred Romance. Drawing Closer to the Heart of God, Nashville, Tennessee (etc.), Thomas Nelson, 1997, pp. 179-180.

68

“As soon as one accepts that freedom is, in the first instance, non-interference [lack of prohibitions or requirements], one implicitly accepts the religion-as-tyranny view. Religion regulates not merely our relationship with God, not merely our attitude towards others, but even our relation to ourselves. Specifically, it demands submission to something greater, something transcendent, something objective, which re-connects the self with everything else. Religion interferes with unqualified personal choice, but this is not a limitation on freedom. It is an aide, a guide, a means to freedom. The best way to counter the ‘religion-as-tyranny’ crusade is not through one more attempt to water down the dogmatic or moral content of religion to satisfy the liberal craving for ever more freedom of choice. Such compromises are doomed to failure.” – Louis Groarke, ‘What is freedom? Why Christianity and Theoretical Liberalism cannot be reconciled’, Heythrop Journal, XLVII (2006), p. 259.

67

“Depending on the Gnostic gospels for authentic historical information about Jesus is like learning aerodynamics by watching Snoopy fly his doghouse. But the facts won’t dissuade those eager to drain Christianity of its moral authority. For them, the Gospel of Judas, The Da Vinci Code, and The Jesus Papers are just the latest clubs to use against their oldest and most obstinate enemy.” – Brian Saint-Paul, editor of Crisis Magazine, editorial The Assault on Jesus, 9 May 2006; formerly available electronically from the Crisis website:http://www.crisismagazine.com

66

“It is our vocation at this dark period in the life of our church [the Church of England] to keep the land tilled, quietly preserving the faith, upholding Scripture, teaching the people of God, waiting and praying for the day when under God the darkness of this present world … is dispelled once again by the overwhelming light of Christ. / In the meantime, God does not call us to be successful, for that is never the Christian’s vocation. Rather we are to be faithful – nothing more, nothing less – however dark the way, however painful, however impossible the future may appear.” – George Austin, A Journey to Faith, London, Triangle (SPCK), 1992, p. 158.

65

“Worry … is nothing more than prayer to the devil. You have a Savior, and your Savior has made it clear what you are to do when your heart is troubled’ – great-aunt Eulesta’s words, recalled in Tom Morrisey’s novel Dark Fathom, Grand Rapids, Zondervan, 2005, p. 114 and also Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength. It does not enable us to escape evil. It makes us unfit to face evil when it comes. It is the interest you pay on trouble before it comes” – Corrie ten Boom, as quoted on the ReJesus site.

64

“We must preserve Hertham [this earth/world as it is] not only because it is beautiful but also because it is our home, our true home, the only home we can be sure of.” – sceptic Professor Simpkins in Harry Blamires’s fable New Town, Grand Rapids, Revell, 2005, p. 65; see Readers Guide to New Town, and associated sites.

63

“Church should be a haven for people who feel terrible about themselves – theologically, that is our ticket for entry. God needs humble people (which usually means humbled people) to accomplish his work.” – Philip Yancey, What’s so Amazing About Grace?, Grand Rapids, Zondervan, 1997, p. 274.

62

Dan Rather (CBS television interviewer) to Mother Teresa of Calcutta: “When you pray, what do you say to God?” Teresa: “I don’t say anything, I listen”. Rather: “Well okay … when God speaks to you, then, what does he say?” Teresa: He doesn’t say anything. He listens. … And if you don’t understand that, I can’t explain it to you” (recounted by Bob & Debby Gass, in The Word For Today, Winter 2006/7 (entry for Friday 3 November 2006)).

61

“… it is not religion but atheism that requires a Darwinian explanation. It seems perplexing why nature would breed a group of people who see no purpose to life or the universe, indeed whose only moral drive seems to be sneering at their fellow human beings who do have a sense of purpose. Here is where the biological expertise of Dawkins and his friends could prove illuminating. Maybe they can turn their Darwinian lens on themselves and help us understand how atheism, like the human tailbone and the panda’s thumb, somehow survived as an evolutionary leftover of our primitive past.” – Dinesh D’Souza, “God knows why faith is thriving”, San Francisco Chronicle, 22 October 2006.

60

“Young people are drawn into cults whose rules are eight times as strict as any mainstream church would ever dare to inflict and they’re drawn in because they’re looking for two things: the supernatural and a set of rules. Why is the church falling down? Because it’s afraid on both scores.” – Anne Widdecombe, “Anything but a Quaker”, interviewed by Roy McCloughry for Third Way, 20 July 1998, http://www.thirdway.org.uk/past/index.htm

59

“When I say I despised it [the Church of England, which she left to join the Roman Catholic Church], I do not mean the thousands of very conscientious clergy who teach the faith. What I am talking about was the eternal tendency of the hierarchy all the time to sacrifice faith to fashion, creed to compromise. I think the debate on the ordination of women typified that. It was not about theology, it wasn’t about ‘Is it possible for a woman to be part of the apostolic succession?’, it wasn’t about headship. The leader of the Church of England actually said, ‘If we don’t do this, we shan’t be acceptable to the secular world.’” – Anne Widdecome, interviewed for Third Way [see 76].

58

“It is more than curious that Britain and Russia … have halted the death penalty for the guilty, but do nothing to restrict incredibly high abortion rates that kill the innocent. This reflects an inverted value system.” – Cal Thomas, writing about the execution of Saddam Hussein in the Jewish World Review (US), 3 January 2007 (internet).

57

“I learned from experience that joy does not reside in the things about us, but in the very depths of the soul, that one can have it in the gloom of a dungeon as well as in the palace of a king.” – Thérèse of Lisieux, in her autobiography The Story of a Soul, Rockford, Illinois, Tan Books, 1997, p. 99.

56

“In China, I met with one of the missionaries who had been expelled in 1950. ‘We felt so sorry for the church we left behind’, he said. ‘They had no one to teach them, no printing presses, no seminaries, no one to run their clinics and orphanages. No resources, really, except the Holy Spirit.’ It appears the Holy Spirit did just fine. – Philip Yancey on the phenomenal growth of Christianity in modern China, Finding God in Unexpected Places, London, Hodder & Stoughton, 2002, p. 186.

55

“Life is always and in all circumstances sacred, or intrinsically of no account; it is inconceivable that it should be in some cases the one, and in some another. … For man, made in God’s image, to turn aside from this universal love, and fashion his own judgements based on his own fears and disparities, is a fearful thing, bound to have fearful consequences.” – Malcolm Muggeridge in his book concerned with Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Something Beautiful for God, London, Fontana, 1972, p. 29-30.          

54

“It is only possible to succeed at second-rate pursuits – like becoming a millionaire or a prime minister, winning a war, seducing beautiful women, flying through the stratosphere, or landing on the moon. First-rate pursuits – involving, as they must, trying to understand what life is about and trying to convey that understanding – inevitably result in a sense of failure. … Understanding is for ever unattainable. Therein lies the inevitability of failure in embarking upon its quest, which is none the less the only one worthy of serious attention.” – Malcolm Muggeridge on failure, in a collection of his radio presentations, Muggeridge Through the Microphone, London, Collins Fontana, 1969, p. 75.

53

“The heaviest blow that ever struck humanity was the coming of Christianity” – not Richard Dawkins, Philip Pullman etc., but Adolf Hitler, in a speech of 1941, according to Richard Swancy Woodling, “God, the Universe and Darwin. The Jury Speaks”, an article on the internet at: http://www.reachouttrust.org/articles/evolution/articlepdf.pdf

52

“If God is love, he must utterly reject, and ultimately deal with, all that pollutes, distorts and destroys his world and his image-bearing creatures. … In his magisterial Exclusion and Embrace (Nashville: Abingdon, 1994), [Miroslav Volf] demonstrates … that it simply won’t do, when faced with radical evil, to say, ‘Oh well, don’t worry, I will love you and forgive you anyway.’ That (as the [Church of England] 1938 Doctrine Report already saw) is not forgiveness; it is belittling the evil that has been done. Genuine forgiveness must first ‘exclude’, argues Volf, before it can ‘embrace’; it must name and shame the evil, and find an appropriate way of dealing with it, before reconciliation can happen. Otherwise we are just papering over the cracks. As I said early on, if God does not hate the wickedness that happens in his beautiful world, he is neither a good nor a just God, and chaos is come again.” – Tom Wright, in his essay “The Cross and the Caricatures. A response to Robert Jenson, Jeffrey John, and a new volume entitled Pierced for Our Transgressions”, 2007, Fulcrum http://www.fulcrum-anglican.org.uk/news/2007/20070423wright.cfm?doc=205

51

“Evolution supposedly explains the reason for our existence. The “free-thinking” evolutionists believe that we are simply the result of a cosmic collision of biochemistry and chance. This scientifically-invalid position is alluring to those who reject existence of God because it means that there is no objective, moral truth. To the evolutionist, values are as fluid as one’s emotions and animal urges. Since they claim that we are just advanced apes derived from a common ancestor, this simply helps increase the speed at which our society slips into decline.” – Tom Sutcliff, Why Evolution is a Fraud. A Secular and Common-Sense Deconstruction, Red State Publishing, 2007, p. 1.

50

“Sigmund Freud …was quick to argue that believing in God was an illusion grounded in human longing for consolation. Even so, he had little time for the disturbing thought that atheism might be equally illusory, grounded in the human longing for autonomy. One of the driving impulses that brought the modern world into existence was the human desire to be free – free to make our own choices, choose our own destinies and not be accountable to any higher authority for our own decisions” – Alister McGrath, Resurrection, London, SPCK, 2007, p. 30.

49

“I do not always get what I want [in prayer], but I do not want a God who always agrees with me: I want some mystery and unknowing and unpredictability. To wish otherwise is to want God to become one of us. That will not do” – Roger Haycraft, Swallowing Christianity Whole, The Maypole Press, 2006, p. 5.

48

“Nature is what we were put in this world to rise above” – Rose Sanger, Katharine Hepburn’s character in the film The African Queen (1951).

47

“The fact that people have a lot of virtues … doesn’t prove anything about the goodness of their actions. You can have all the virtues – that’s to say, all except the two that really matter, understanding and compassion – you can have all the others, I say, and be a thoroughly bad man. Indeed, you can’t be really bad unless you do have most of the virtues. Look at Milton’s Satan for example. Brave, strong, generous, loyal, prudent, temperate, self-sacrificing. And let’s give the [1930s] dictators the credit that’s due to them; some of them are nearly as virtuous as Satan. Not quite, I admit, but nearly. That’s why they can achieve so much evil.” – Bill Propter, in Aldous Huxley’s novel After Many A Summer(1939), Grafton edition, 1976, etc., p. 97.

46

“One of the most frightening things about following Jesus is his requirement that we abandon responsibility for deciding how we will help him.” – Adrian Plass, The Unlocking. God’s Escape Plan for Frightened People, Bible Reading Fellowship, 1994, etc., p. 82.

45

“… while infanticide was commonly accepted in ancient times, only the Jews and the Christians actively opposed it. The strength of their opposition paid off when infanticide was outlawed by Emperor Valentinian, a Christian, in the 4th century. So, as Western culture abandons its Christian roots, we ought not to be surprised that infanticide is making a comeback”. – from Bishop Tom Wright’s sermon The Uncomfortable Truth of Easter (Easter Day 2008), as reported by Anglican Mainstream.

44

“It is thought grand and wise to condemn no opinion whatsoever, and to pronounce all earnest and clever teachers to be trustworthy, however heterogeneous and mutually destructive their opinions may be. – Everything forsooth is true, and nothing is false!” – J. C. Ryle, Holiness (1877), edition produced by James Clark, London, 1956, p. 11

43

“The paradox of hedonism [is] the simple, yet stultifying, fact that pleasure cannot satisfy … Pleasure, beauty, personal relationships: all seem to promise so much, and yet when we grasp them, we find that what we were seeking was not located in them, but lies beyond them.” – Alister McGrath, Understanding Doctrine. Its Purpose and Relevance for Today, London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1990, p. 46.

42

“When God wishes to be the whole life of souls … all individual ideas, understanding, endeavours, searching, or argument become a source of fantasy. And when, after several experiences of the folly of their own efforts, they finally recognize their futility, they discover that God has blocked every other avenue in order that they should walk with him alone.” – Jean-Pierre de Caussade, The Sacrament of the Present Moment (trans. K. Muggerdige), Fount, 1981, p. 32-3.

41

“Does [N. T. ]Wright [Bishop of Durham] really believe that with women bishops on the way, that England’s moribund parishes will miraculously fill up on Sunday morning with torpid English men and women, filled with coffee, emerging out of the fog to fill near empty pews to hear the Rt. Rev. Eleanor Snodgrass, formerly just the Rev. Snodgrass drone on about the environment, and during the passing of the peace, insist that all the old age pensioners grab their canes go outside and hug a tree? … Rowan Williams and his Instruments of Unity are presiding over a dying body, who many believe is no longer the Body of Christ, but something altogether different” – David Virtue, Virtueonline, 8 July 2008:

40

“… the secret of living is the same as the secret of joy; both revolve around Christ. Don’t try to pursue happiness, just cultivate a Christ-centred, Christ-controlled life, and you’ll have more happiness than you know what to do with!” – Bob & Debby Gass with Ruth Gass Halliday, The Word For Today, entry for 11 July 2008.

39

“ … how do supposedly religious people reject the sanctity of life and support someone [Barack Obama] who voted against a [U.S.] “Born Alive Infant Protection” law which would protect babies accidentally born alive after a botched abortion? Frankly, if that’s not evil, I’m not sure what is. And it takes a priest in Greenville, South Carolina [Rev. Jay Scott Newman] to rise up against all the moral relativism we face in the world and speak the truth. … one thing that can be said with clarity and consistency: the [Roman] Catholic Church has been a beacon in leading the fight against the destruction of the unborn.” – Mike Gallagher, ‘Finally, a Religious Leader with Guts’, Townhall.com , 14 November 2008

38

“The life and ministry of Jesus must, above all others, be the example that the Church should follow in seeking to be obedient to the great commission [Matthew 28: 20]. Any other example will leave the Church wanting. One has to conclude, therefore, that if any sector of the Church is failing to follow Jesus in casting out demons, then that sector will suffer.” – Peter Horrobin, Healing Through Deliverance, Lancaster (England), Sovereign World, revised and expanded edition, 2008, p. 185

37

“To be exposed to British culture is to run a gauntlet of degradation, vulgarity, obscenity, prurience, voyeurism, cruelty and sadism.” – Melanie Phillips on the BBC’s broadcasting of Jonathan Ross and Russell Brand’s obscene ‘prank’; 28 October 2008.

36

“The dilemma any false prophet has to handle is that there comes a point where you really have to start acting like a wolf, otherwise all that dressing up as a sheep would have been rather pointless. … This is a problem which Gene Robinson, the controversial Bishop of New Hampshire, has handled with some skill. … The risks that false prophets are prepared to take need to be matched by continuing courageous action on the part of godly leaders, willing if necessary to risk institutional order rather than risk the truth.” – Charles Raven, Anglican SPREAD website, 20 January 2009.

35

“It is crucial to recall the reality that lies behind [Barack Obama’s] rhetoric. Denouncing “those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents” comes ill from a man whose flagship legislation, the Freedom of Choice Act, will impose abortion, including partial-birth abortion, on every state in the Union. It seems the era of Hope is to be inaugurated with a slaughter of the innocents.” – Gerald Warner, Telegraph.co.uk, Accessed 22 January 2009.

34

“What is really avant-garde today, in the original, combative sense of the term, is to stand for life, for beauty, and for truth. Nothing shocks us more.” – Micah Mattix, ‘Shock Value’, Touchstone, June 2009

33

“An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last.” – attributed to Sir Winston Churchill

32

“For some years now, the medical establishment has fallen under the spell of academic ethicists and philosophers who, in accordance with fashionable dogma, have no respect whatever for the intrinsic value of human life — or indeed any absolute values. … Life should be respected in itself. That is our most basic protection against the kind of inhumanity that lay behind the eugenics movement and the ideology of the Nazis. Doctors should be in the first line of defence against such barbarism. The fact that they have blundered onto the wrong side shows how badly this society has lost its way.” – Melanie Phillips, ‘The Royal College of Infanticide’ 6 November 2006

31

“Without the conscious pursuit of beauty we risk falling into a world of addictive pleasures and routine desecration, a world in which the worthwhileness of human life is no longer clearly perceivable” – Roger Scruton, “Beauty and its corruptions”, Catholic Education Research Center.

30

“An environment that stifles his right to a voice is worse than one that overheats” – Antonia Senior on the muzzling of global warming sceptics, such as Ian Plimer, The Times (London), 24 July 2009, p. 27.

29

“The ethic of the child-batterer is the abortion ethic. Child abusers, like abortion activists, believe in adults’ right to be in control of their lives. Child abusers, like abortionists, believe that only children who gratify parental desires have a right to exist. It is hard to believe that the cultural message contained in abortion, the insistent eulogies to control, and the references to parenting as a right and a pleasure have not contributed to the explosion in child abuse and neglect.”, Maggie Gallagher, Enemies of Eros. Bonus Books, 1989, pp. 238-239 (with thanks to Bill Muehlenberg Culture Watch).

28

“ … where the human spirit meets true evil then people either turn into demons or become Christ-like. The terrible reality, though, is that any of us could go either way.” – John Richardson (“the Ugley vicar”) on the art of George Gittoes.

27

“In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” – attributed to George Orwell

26

“A ‘culture of death’ is a culture that, failing to recognize the infinite worth of every human person, chooses death as a ‘solution’ to its problems” – Christopher West, Theology of the Body for Beginners. A Basic Introduction to Pope John Paul II’s Sexual Revolution, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Ascension Press, 2004, p. 14

25

“It is the very principle of the Culture of Death that the “value” of human life depends upon the valuers, and not upon the God-given nature of the human being in question” – Anthony Esolen, ‘Notre Madame et le President. There Was No Moral Common Ground’Touchstone, July/August 2009.

24

“This prayer of petition [Jesus, in Gethsemane, particularly Luke 26: 42] finds a climax of belief in obedience to a Father who has effectively hidden himself in the darkness that surrounds his Son. As Job said … ‘If he would slay me, I should not hesitate; I should still argue my cause to his face’ (Job 13:15). Even the apparently inevitable death of the holy one will not dampen his trust in God’s providence, even the providence of a God who seems to have absented himself from the world he has created.” – Martin Israel, Gethsemane. The Transfiguring Love, London, Fount Paperbacks, 1987, p. 79.

23

“… I would argue that this popular notion of hope [“vaguely positive thoughts of the future, of a time when all the things that are wrong with the world will be undone”] could be more accurately defined as optimism. It is easy to confuse optimism with hope, but optimism in the face of death is merely a form of denial. Optimism insists that it will all work out here and now, and yet the reality of everyday life demonstrates that this is not so. It will not all work out, at least not until the time of the new heavens and the new earth. For as long as sin exists in this world, people will suffer and die.” – Amy Julia Becker, “The Reality of Hope”First Things, 17 November 2009

22

“There seem to be two life plans for Christians…the abundance/blessing plan and the death/suffering plan. I assume I am on the death and suffering plan – that God is crouching behind a corner waiting for things to go well in order to take everything away so that I can learn to trust in him alone. That’s a terribly sinful and unfaithful way to think – I know that – and not at all true about God, but for some reason that’s where my mind goes when things seem to be taking a turn for the worst.” – Matt Kennedy, sharing his initial feelings when TEC removed him and his young family from their parsonage, and his congregation from their church, Stand Firm site, 25 January 2010.

21

“I’ll bring you more than a song, for a song in itself is not what you have required” – Matt Redman, from his song When The Music Fades (The Heart of Worship); a Christian musician summing up the purpose of all Christian writing.

20

“Why is there such a fury against religion now? Because religion is the one reliable force that stands in the way of the power of the strong over the weak. The one reliable force that forms the foundation of the concept of the rule of law. The one reliable force that restrains the hand of the man of power. In an age of power-worship, the Christian religion has become the principal obstacle to the desire of earthly utopians for absolute power.” – Peter Hitchens, ‘How I found God and peace with my atheist brother’http://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/ entry for 11 March 2010 1:52 PM

19

“Non-Catholics often have an image of the Catholic Church as a ruthlessly efficient organization with a chain of command that would make the armed forces jealous. The reality for most of the 1960s to 1980s was the opposite. A priest could preach heresy, profane the Holy Mass, destroy the piety of his people and face no consequences.” – Raymond J. de Souza on the scandals that have engulfed the Roman Catholic Church, and the real reasons behind the abuses. Fr Raymond J. de Souza, “Culture Change in the Church”The National post – Holy Post, 25 March 2010

18

“The line separating good and evil passes not through states, nor between classes, nor between political parties either — but right through every human heart — and through all human hearts” – Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, The Gulag Archipelago, London, Collins/Fontana, 1976, Vol.2, pp.597-8.

17

“Once, when preparing a lecture on Cardinal Newman, I summarized his classic Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine in this fashion: Truth ripens, error rots. The homosexual rights movement is rotten to the core. It has no future. There is no life in it. Sooner or later, those who are caught up in it are going to wake up from the dream of unbridled desire or else die. It is just a matter of time. The question is: how long? How many children are going to be sacrificed to this Moloch?” – Dr. Ronald G. Lee in his essay ‘The books, the porn the truth. The truth about the homosexual rights movement’ in Gods, Gays and the Church, ed. Lisa Nolland, Chris Sugden and Sarah Finch, London, The Latimer Trust, 2008, p. 73-4.

16

“Silence in the face of evil is itself evil. God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak.” – attributed to Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

15

“O my Creator, do not pour so precious a liquid into so broken a vessel [as me]. For you have seen already how often I spill it. Do not lay up treasures like these where the longing for life’s consolations is not as dead as it should be, or they will be utterly wasted. How can you entrust this walled city and the keys of its citadel to a defender so cowardly that he will let the enemy in at the first assault?” – Teresa of Avila, Life, translated by J. M. Cohen, Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1957, p. 123.

14

“The separation of procreation from sexual intercourse is the root cause of all sexual perversions.” – attributed to Sigmund Freud.

13

“You put yourself with God, empty, perhaps, but hungry and thirsty for him; and if in sincerity you cannot say that you want God you can perhaps tell him that you want to want him; and if you cannot say even that perhaps you can say that you want to want to want him! Thus you can be very near him in your naked sincerity; and he will do the rest …” – Michael Ramsey, The Christian Priest Today, London, SPCK, 1972, 1980, pp. 14-15.

12

“Where orthodoxy is optional, orthodoxy will sooner or later be proscribed.” – attributed to the late Fr. John Neuhaus, founding editor of First Things, http://www.firstthings.com/index.php

11

“Civilizations die from suicide, not from murder.” – attributed to Arnold Toynbee.

10

“If you are a white Christian man upholding traditional family values and expressing a desire to stop immigration and leave the E[uropean] U[nion], while being sceptical of man-made global warming and believing that Darwinian evolution does not explain the origin of life on earth, Britain is no longer your country.” – Melanie Phillips, ‘I think, therefore I’m guilty’ The Spectator, 17 September 2010

9

“One writes such a story [Lord of The Rings] not out of the leaves of trees still to be observed, nor by means of botany and soil science; but it grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of the mind: out of all that has been seen or thought or read, that has long ago been forgotten, descending into the deeps” – J. R. R. Tolkien quoted in: Humphrey Carpenter, J. R. R. Tolkien. A Biography, London, Unwin Paperbacks (Allen & Unwin), 1977, p. 131.

8

“Politics that does not root itself in moral values is simply a way of refereeing human selfishness” – Giles Fraser, Mail Online, 4 April 2010

7

“Jesus debunked the myth that love is based on feelings. It’s an act of your will, and if you love God you’ll keep His commandments. It’s that simple” – Bob Gass and Debby Gass with Ruth Gass Halliday, The Word For Today, UCB, entry for 7 October 2010.

6

“The more widely held [of two errors] is that culture can be preserved, extended and developed in the absence of religion. This error may be held by the Christian in common with the infidel, and its proper refutation would require an historical analysis of considerable refinement, because the truth is not immediately apparent … a culture may linger on, and indeed produce some of its most brilliant artistic and other successes after the religious faith has fallen into decay.” – T. S. Eliot, Notes Towards the Definition of Culture, London, Faber & Faber, 1948 etc. (1962 edition, p. 30).

5

“Many people do not consciously worship God but still say they believe in him; they run the same danger of exchanging the splendour of immortal God for an idea of God which they have worked out for themselves or picked up from others; if the God they have is not the God we learn about in Jesus then it will be a God thought out by mortal man and therefore like mortal man.” – Ernest Best, The Letter of Paul to the Romans (The Cambridge Bible Commentary on the New English Bible), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1967, pp. 21-22. Emphases in the original.

4

“I do not deny the need for radical restatements. But I do deny the legitimacy of continuing to use the language of Christian conviction while asserting that that language does not represent objective fact, and of interpreting it in a way that deprives words of anything resembling their normal meaning. In the face of death and bereavement this kind of thing is asshabby morally as it is shoddy intellectually” – W. Jardine Grisbrooke in Gilbert Cope (ed.), Dying, Death and Disposal, London, SPCK, 1970, p. 59.

3

“He who has so little knowledge of human nature as to seek happiness by changing anything but his own disposition, will waste his life in fruitless efforts, and multiply the grief which he purposes to remove” – attributed to Samuel Johnson.

2

“Presumably you think you have a right to live, but you obviously don’t think that I have if someone who is not me decides my deformities and disabilities are such that my life would be worthless. Hitler, with his euthanasia program, was able – with the collaboration of the medical profession – to write us off as life unworthy of life. You say you are a socialist, I say you are a national socialist. You think you have a right to live, and yet you aid and abet the process of ridding the world of deformed people.” – from the Open Letter to British (Labour) politician Mo Mowlam from Nabil Shaban (disabled, Left-wing actor) concerning abortion of disabled people, published in the New Statesman and Society, 9 April 1993, viewable at:reocities.com/Paris/arc/3165/New_Statesman.html

1


The BBC is now routinely subject to criticisms of anti-Christian bias in its coverage of Christianity and related issues. In the lead-up to the visit of Pope Benedict XVI to Britain last September, the BBC led what amounted to a campaign of anti-papal and anti-Catholic programming that led Edinburgh’s cardinal archbishop, Keith O’Brien, to accuse the broadcaster of being contaminated by ‘a radically secular and socially liberal mindset.’” – Hilary White, ‘BBC marks anniversary of King James Bible by claiming King David was gay’ LifeSiteNews, 19 January 2011;